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VP of Finance: The Non-Obvious Hire

A few days ago, I tweeted this: This generated a good discussion in the thread with some great input.  VPs of Finance are a little bit of a counter-intuitive hire in early-stage startups.  It’s pretty obvious to most founders why they need senior people in charge of engineering, product, sales and marketing. You need people … Continue reading VP of Finance: The Non-Obvious Hire

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A few days ago, I tweeted this:

This generated a good discussion in the thread with some great input. 

VPs of Finance are a little bit of a counter-intuitive hire in early-stage startups.  It’s pretty obvious to most founders why they need senior people in charge of engineering, product, sales and marketing. You need people to build, and you need people to sell. 

But finance feels like a back-office role, a cost center.  Sure, we’ll need one, but “later”.  If we hired them now, what would they do all day? Would they have enough work?  Can’t we just outsource the role for now? Shouldn’t we prioritize other roles, like Head of People or Head of Legal? Can we even afford one? Shouldn’t we hire one or two more engineers instead?

Yet, interestingly, I’ve never heard a startup CEO say after the fact that they regretted hiring a VP of Finance too early.  But I’ve heard several CEOs say they wish they had hired one much earlier.

My point in this post is that founders should consider hiring a head of finance earlier than most would think.  

VPs of finance are an essential part of a 4-legged chair that provides a very solid foundation for any startup:  VP of Engineering, VP of Sales, VP of Marketing and VP of Finance.  David Sacks had a great post recently showing how those four pillars should operate together in a SaaS startup (“The Cadence”).  With some nuances, this general philosophy is broadly applicable across all types of startups, whether enterprise or consumer. 

Some semantics: in this post, I’m using the term “VP of Finance” to mean a reasonably senior person that can head up the finance function in an early stage startup.  Sometimes they’ll have a different title (like Director of Finance) or perhaps no title at all.  

They generally won’t (and shouldn’t) have the “CFO” title.  Most early-stage startups are not ready for a CFO.  Chief Financial Officers, as the name indicates, are C-level folks.  CFOs are pretty senior professionals who, in addition to mastering the technical aspects of the finance role, are very strategic in their approach, can manage larger teams and handle more complex transactions, from M&A to an IPO.  Good CFOs are hard to find, expensive and generally don’t make sense to hire until the startup reaches the growth stage.  

Let’s dig into a few details – provided in bullet point format for easy scanning.

What does a VP of Finance do, in an early stage startup?

  • Accounting: manage a controller, work with outside accountants, work on audits, etc.)
  • Financial planning and analysis (FP&A) – budgets, projections etc 
  • Pay bills, sends invoices, reimburse employee expenses
  • Overall cash management (treasury)
  • Tax
  • Partner with the CEO on investor relations – help prepare board decks, help with fundraising (process, due diligence, etc), update the VCs
  • Venture debt and relationship with banks
  • Partner with VP of sales: manage revenue, pays sales commissions etc. 
  • Help with options plans, 409(a)
  • Risk control: D&O, insurance
  • Put scalable systems in place (e.g. transition from Quickbooks to Netsuite)
  • A big “catch all” category, depending on who else is on the team: some analytics (tracking KPIs and OKRs), some legal (contract review), some operations (vendor management, lease management etc.)

Why should you hire a VP of Finance early?

  • Keep the house in order: financials and key metrics (churn etc) are accurate and available promptly
  • Avoid disasters: I’ve seen companies go under because the CEO didn’t understand how their cash cycle evolved as the company grew, or simply didn’t realize a big expense was coming up when the company was already low on cash.  The VP of Finance helps the CEO have an accurate picture of the cash situation and burn at all times, and helps build realistic projections (and reforecast as necessary)
  • Run a tight ship: stuff and people get paid on time, KPIs are tracked
  • Avoid accumulating “organizational debt”: any unaddressed deficiency around accounting, finance, processes, operations, etc accumulates and compounds over time, and becomes very painful to untangle down the road
  • Provide leverage to the CEO (very important!): the VP of Finance does a million things that give time to the CEO to focus on running the business 
  • Partner with the CEO on strategy:  while covering the tactical aspects of finance and operation makes a world of difference as it is, the best VPs of Finance engage with the CEO also at a strategic level, as they have a company-wide perspective

What does “early” mean? When should you hire a VP of Finance?

  • Yes, it’s ok to start with an outsourced firm, “outsourced CFO”, or other individual service provider.  You should do this at the very beginning, at the pre-seed and seed level
  • But soon enough, you’ll experience the usual issues that one encounters with outsourced providers:  
    • They will do the job, but often just the job, typically the more accounting-focused part
    • Even with plenty of good will, it’s hard to any third party to truly provide meaningful input, in large part because they don’t have enough inside, day-to-day knowledge of the company to be able to
    • The quality of who does the work at the service provider may vary and change over time 
  • How early should you hire someone in-house? While hard to generalize, probably as soon as the company has some level of recurring revenue traction, typically shortly after the Series A – this is in contrast to what I see most companies do, which is hiring a VP Finance after their Series B, or sometimes even later. 

How do you go about building an early stage startup finance team?

  • Many recommend that the first hire in a finance team should be a controller, because you can’t build a finance function if you don’t have a strong accounting basis.  
  • I generally agree with this, but a) it’s difficult for a CEO who doesn’t have a finance background to hire and manage a controller and b) the finance role that provides most leverage to a CEO is the FP&A part (meaning doing the financial models, tracking metrics etc).
  • I’ve seen situations where the first hire was an FP&A person and the accounting part was outsourced.  Not orthodox, but I’ve seen it work for a bit
  • Budget permitting, my preferred configuration is to hire a VP of Finance with an FP&A background, and have that person recruit and manage a controller.  You can go pretty far with a finance team of two. 

What’s the right background for a VP of Finance?

  • The orthodox answer is someone who grew up through the ranks of controllers, ideally a CPA with an audit background – basically someone with a very deep mastery of all nuances of accounting
  • However, ideally you want someone who can partner with the CEO and provide some immediate value on the budgeting and forecasting front, and over time can scale to provide strategic value to the CEO and board.  My experience is that the folks that tend to be best on the strategic front come more often from an FP&A background, more than accounting
  • From that perspective, a great candidate for a fast-growing Series A startup would be someone who was a finance analyst at a larger company early in their career, and then worked at one or two comparable startups in the past, rising to become a manager or VP
  • An ideal candidate is someone with the potential to graduate to be promoted from VP of Finance to CFO. 
  • What about investment bankers? That question comes up often as there’s a steady stream of very smart folks coming from top banks, interested in the startup world, and looking at finance as a natural transition point. Are they good candidates? It’s a nuanced topic, and depends on individual circumstances. I’ll just say that it’s a much less natural transition than one would assume. Yes investment banking builds a deep understanding of a company’s financials, but the context and the skillset are pretty different. When one of the companies I work with is recruiting a VP of Finance and considers candidates with an investment banking background, I typically recommend that they focus on folks have spent at least a couple of years in a startup after leaving the bank.

Source: http://mattturck.com/vpfinance/

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Private Equity

Boston startups expand region’s venture capital footprint

This year has shaken up venture capital, turning a hot early start to 2020 into a glacial period permeated with fear during the early days of COVID-19. That ice quickly melted as venture capitalists discovered that demand for software and other services that startups provide was accelerating, pushing many young tech companies back into growth […]

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This year has shaken up venture capital, turning a hot early start to 2020 into a glacial period permeated with fear during the early days of COVID-19. That ice quickly melted as venture capitalists discovered that demand for software and other services that startups provide was accelerating, pushing many young tech companies back into growth mode, and investors back into the check-writing arena.

Boston has been an exemplar of the trend, with early pandemic caution dissolving into rapid-fire dealmaking as summer rolled into fall.

We collated new data that underscores the trend, showing that Boston’s third quarter looks very solid compared to its peer groups, and leads greater New England’s share of American venture capital higher during the three-month period.

For our October look at Boston and its startup scene, let’s get into the data and then understand how a new cohort of founders is cropping up among the city’s educational network.

A strong Q3, a strong 2020

Boston’s third quarter was strong, effectively matching the capital raised in New York City during the three-month period. As we head into the fourth quarter, it appears that the silver medal in American startup ecosystems is up for grabs based on what happens in Q4.

Boston could start 2021 as the number-two place to raise venture capital in the country. Or New York City could pip it at the finish line. Let’s check the numbers.

According to PitchBook data shared with TechCrunch, the metro Boston area raised $4.34 billion in venture capital during the third quarter. New York City and its metro area managed $4.45 billion during the same time period, an effective tie. Los Angeles and its own metro area managed just $3.90 billion.

In 2020 the numbers tilt in Boston’s favor, with the city and surrounding area collecting $12.83 billion in venture capital. New York City came in second through Q3, with $12.30 billion in venture capital. Los Angeles was a distant third at $8.66 billion for the year through Q3.

Source: https://techcrunch.com/2020/10/23/boston-startups-expand-regions-venture-capital-footprint/

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Private Equity

Alternative Investments/Real Estate: Housing Market Demand Is “Insane”

Speaking to CNBC on Power Lunch, Glenn Kelman, CEO of real estate brokerage Redfin (NASDAQ: RDFN), said he expected the current boom conditions in the housing market to last well into next year. He attributed the high demand to affluent professionals looking for remote homes as well as low interest rates. Also, he thinks some sellers will put their properties on the market only after the presidential election.

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Alternative Investments/Real Estate: Housing Market Demand Is “Insane”

https://platodata.net/wp-content/uploads/2020/10/alternative-investments-real-estate-housing-market-demand-is-insane.jpg

Redfin CEO Glenn Kelman says the boom could last into next year.

Speaking to CNBC on Power Lunch, Glenn Kelman, CEO of real estate brokerage Redfin (NASDAQ: RDFN), said he expected the current boom conditions in the housing market to last well into next year. He attributed the high demand to affluent professionals looking for remote homes as well as low interest rates. Also, he thinks some sellers will put their properties on the market only after the presidential election. (CNBC)

Kelman: Too good to last forever

“This level of demand is absolutely insane. I would expect it to last into 2021, at least,” Kelman said.

Recent data from the National Association of Realtors shows up the strength in the housing market.

Existing home sales shot up 9.4% in September beating expectations. Even though the median purchase price of a home rose approximately 15% year over year, there is just a 2.7-month supply of for-sale homes, showing tight market inventory conditions.

The 30-year fixed-rate mortgage averaged 2.80% for the week ending Oct. 22, down from 2.81% in the previous week and 3.75% a year ago, according to the Freddie Mac Primary Mortgage Market Survey. Therefore, mortgage rates crept even lower in the latest week.

However, “there’s no way it can last forever,” Kelman warned of the bullish conditions.

Canada: Off the charts

Meanwhile, at the northern neighbor, home sales activity in September is described as “off-the-charts.”

Housing data released by the Canadian Real Estate Association (CREA) last week showed a nationwide year-over-year increase in sales of 45.6%.

This was a new all-time monthly record for the third month in a row.

“This is starting to sound like a broken record (about records being broken), but Canadian home sales and prices set records once again in September … as they did in July and August,” said Shaun Cathcart, senior economist at CREA, in a statement.

Real Estate ETFs in the U.S.

The year-to-date performance of some real estate ETFs is shown below:

iShares U.S. Home Construction ETF (ITB)              +24.61%

SPDR S&P Homebuilders ETF (XHB)                          +20.83%

Vanguard Real Estate Index Fund ETF                      -13.91%

It may be noted that despite the boom conditions in housing, real estate ETFs and stocks have declined in recent days.

According to Barron’s, this may be due to yields on the 10-year and 30-year Treasuries moving higher in recent weeks.

Other reasons could be fears of inflation ticking up in the future amidst an improving economic situation.

Nevertheless, the view is that interest rates are likely to remain low for longer. So demand may remain strong.

“Part of what is fueling this boom is that the economy has just split into two and rich people are able to access capital almost for free, so, of course, they’re going to use that money to buy homes,” said Redfin’s Kelman.

Related Story:   Mortgage Rates Set Another Record Low; Real Estate ETFs Could Benefit

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Source: https://dailyalts.com/alternative-investments-real-estate-housing-market-demand-is-insane/

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Private Equity

Asda’s new owner EG Group seeks new leadership ahead of IPO – report

EG Group is owned by the billionaire Issa brothers and the private equity firm TDR Capital, who teamed up for a £6.8 billion takeover of Asda last month

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UK grocer Asda Group’s new owner EG Group is looking for a new chairman and independent directors as it prepares for a £10bn initial public offering, The Timesreports.

EG Group is owned by the billionaire Issa brothers and the private equity firm TDR Capital, who teamed up for a £6.8 billion takeover of Asda last month.

The move comes after Deloitte resigned last week as the company’s auditor because of concerns over the group’s governance and lack of internal controls, according to the publication.

A decision on candidates will be taken before the end of this year, although roles haven’t been finalised yet as the company is in the process of deciding whether to float in the UK or the US, The Times reports.

Write to Barcelona editors at barcelonaeditors@dowjones.com

From Dow Jones Newswires

Source: https://www.penews.com/articles/asdas-new-owner-eg-group-seeks-new-leadership-ahead-of-ipo-reports-20201023

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